Author Topic: Automotive jobs  (Read 8837 times)

Offline Yoof

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2013, 12:53:56 pm »
I suppose it depends what your research field is- generally the more non-conventional (advanced engineering) are PHD types with specialties in a specific area obviously related to the automotive sector, but that covers a massive area.

Fair to say it's not common  :)

Offline physicsfool

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2013, 01:30:01 pm »
I work with low temperature plasmas, so its safe to say short of chip etching/thin film deposition. No real similarities with that industry. I was thinking more of the transferable skills. But i suppose i will cross that bridge in 3 years

Offline Etches

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2013, 01:51:16 pm »
Pretty much everything tbh, graduate schemes mostly. From where Robin works at Bentley doing a Manufacturing Scheme to Fords Engine development and Mclarens Road section Aerodynamycist. Not having much luck mind, looking to move south though!

I'm assuming you've inquired at the AMRC on the parkway Tom?

I've seen a few jobs that way Sam but they are mainly control engineering / software development (Java based programming and C+) which I'm not a fan of (did it in uni and it was dead boring) . If something interesting pops up I'd be interested though. Just browing round at the min whilst I'm still working for the Home Office.

Offline gaz g40

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2013, 02:45:36 pm »
You guys seem to have really interesting jobs!
All i do is fit boilers lmao dont sound as technical or as glamoures as you lot

Offline z3i

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2013, 03:02:26 pm »
Thanks for that yoof :) didnt know about the hnd, i looked it up and it looks like more of a college based course, some of which part time. The entry reqiurments for math and physics are a lot lower, so would be a really good way to get into mechanical engineering, as like you say when you finish you can top it up to a degree which by the looks of it most places encourage

I quite like the idea of off cad/cam designing and manufacturing/ machining parts. I looked at pro drive and ricardo, but i can imagine it being quite difficult to get a sponserd job with them.

thing is, im worried if i start uni and leave my job it may go tits up! Then again, its not hard to find a job that pays what mine does. Its getting pretty close to uni cut off dates so i better decide quick or i will have to wait another year! Then again i could study math and physics whilst working?

thanks for the help peeps :)

Offline Andy

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2013, 07:52:38 pm »
Out of interest Pete do you get many people with research backgrounds, say in physics working in your field?
Deffo more common on the advanced engineering side, and probably more so on the electronics side of things. E.g. at our place there are people that fit that brief working on HV battery technology, but also in controls/software.

Offline Andy

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2013, 07:54:49 pm »
I've seen a few jobs that way Sam but they are mainly control engineering / software development (Java based programming and C+) which I'm not a fan of (did it in uni and it was dead boring) . If something interesting pops up I'd be interested though. Just browing round at the min whilst I'm still working for the Home Office.
Automotive controls stuff can be quite interesting, dependant on the role you can end up with quite a lot of in-vehicle development time. It's usually model-based then autocoded, so more Matlab Simulink rather than banging the C+ code out directly.

Offline Etches

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2013, 08:14:01 pm »
Never used simulink but heard really good things about it, prefer solid works, ansys and ansys fluent! J/LR is a tough application process, I got to assesment centre last year but still no luck. Hoping to improve on that in september when the  2014 applications head in.

Offline Tav

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2013, 10:13:55 pm »
Would I be right in saying that getting a job for an OEM is difficult and they are only going to be looking for the cream of the crop?  Doesn't strike me as the sort of industry that's easy to walk into? 

Engineering at uni for me...Monday 9am-12 straight maths.  Same on a Wednesday afternoon 1-3pm.  Then a wee bit on a Thursday.  Fun! 

Different world down south, we're pretty much 100% oil and gas up here and of course there is A LOT of work for all types of engineers.  In my product line we've got drilling engineers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, contracts engineers, electricians, mechanical fitters, data acquisition technicians (my job), software engineers the list goes on...and we're only one tiny dept.

I wouldn't get too bogged down with wanting to work with cars...once your engineering a part that is used in a car it's bound to be pretty far removed from the bigger picture.  Designing a wiring loom for a car would be equally as interesting as designing a wiring loom for a down hole oil tool...or a wiring harness for anything really.  You have so little exposure to the end product in your role I doubt it matters much what it ends up in?  I'm sure if you have a passion for engineering you'd be happy in many different sectors.  I didn't think plant control would be that interesting but that's pretty much what I look after only adapted for well drilling.  Getting into now, it's really interesting.

I've currently got a hard on for machining after we got a new cross over delivered.  2 tonnes finished, god knows how much the original material was.  About 1.5m diameter by 1m.  Same finish quality as a wheel hub and bearing.  Studs the length of your fore arm and nuts the size of your fist.  Who ever machined it is a grade A legend!


Offline Andy

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2013, 10:26:42 pm »
Really depends on your role as to how hands-on you are with the final product. If you're working for a Tier 1 supplier of brake pads, you're not likely to spend that much time playing with cars unless you're a test engineer.

I moved away from automotive electronics hardware design as it was mainly lab or office based, and there wasn't as much vehicle contact as I'd have liked. I moved into an Electrical Systems Integration role which can be extremely vehicle-focussed.

Offline z3i

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #25 on: August 22, 2013, 10:45:49 pm »
I enjoy all mechanical related subjects, but i just love working with cars. I like seeing the end product. If i were to spend months designing and manfacturing an automotive componant, to then it just be shipped of somewhere else and tested, sort of ruins it

Id definitly prefer as much vehicle contact as possible. I find much more job satisfaction from working with cars and seeing the end product. Probably why i enjoyed paint and mechanics. From seeing a smashed up car with suspension hanging out of its ass. Doing all the mechanical work and painting it, seeing the end product after putting in all that work is such a good feeling

Offline Etches

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2013, 08:38:33 am »
Maybe just working for a better body shop would suffice Taylor. You know like one which specialises in show car paint / builds etc. Its hands on start to finish work where you get to see the outcome. Considering you are halfway there already it's not a bad option.

Offline z3i

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2013, 11:35:00 am »
Maybe just working for a better body shop would suffice Taylor. You know like one which specialises in show car paint / builds etc. Its hands on start to finish work where you get to see the outcome. Considering you are halfway there already it's not a bad option.

maybe your right man. Though its pretty dam hard to get into places like that. Unless you start up yourself. I applied and heard back from a few restoration places. But the people that work in places like that tend to have been there for years, once you get into that side of the buisness you tend to stay there

ive only got about 8 months left of my apprenticeship. Maybe just see it through and go from there. Thanks for all the advice peeps
i cant stay in this side of the buisness though. I hate insurance work, bonus, selling hours, effiecency, its all about money money money. Does my head in!
Thanks again, pete and andy you have sick jobs!


Offline Andy

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2013, 03:45:53 pm »
If it's only 8 months left I'd stick it out - at least then you can genuinely say you finished your apprenticeship when applying for other jobs.

Offline Craig g

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Re: Automotive jobs
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2013, 04:44:31 pm »
Woah! That sounds awesome! Why couldnt my apprenticeship have been like that! Whereabouts do you work? Is it a cobra main plant?

Yes Martin! Sounds like a plan :P

im gonna apply to birmingham to do mechanical engineering (automotive)
you need good grades in maths and physics, but if your a mature student with a good back ground they are more flexible, so with any luck!
it seems a bit all too genral, like where and what are the jobs related to it? I need to talk to someone lol
Yh its at the main plant they only actually have the one warehouse and the majority of the seats are made to order but its a brilliant place to work