Author Topic: Roadkill  (Read 2819 times)

Offline physicsfool

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Roadkill
« on: November 21, 2014, 01:37:30 pm »
So i have been watching a lot of roadkill lately (youtube check it out) due to my experiements taking time to run.

Any way its got me back in the road trippin mind set as they are currently on their way to alaska (or rather they were back in april 2013). Only problem is the highest octane fuel they sell is 94 and thats not going to cut the biscuit as the G is mapped to 98/99.

There must be an alternative as their engines cannot all be tuned for low grade fuel

Offline ereeiz

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Re: Roadkill
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2015, 10:52:14 am »
I've ended up watching this too, bit of a late reply but recommend this series, there's currently about 35 episodes

Watch it in order for a lot of the middle episodes to make sense (revisit projects and give updates) so its a bit bizarre when watching updates on cars you know nothing about (bottom of the list up, unless you have a reverse playlist button- youtube don't offer the option to watch a playlist in reverse for some reason)

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL12C0C916CECEA3BC

Offline hayesey

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Re: Roadkill
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2015, 10:37:56 am »
Quote
There must be an alternative as their engines cannot all be tuned for low grade fuel

no, that's exactly what they are.  if you make a car for the us market it needs to run on shit fuel or it's not going to work.  same in case in many countries though.

one of the reasons why american market cars have such awful MPG as well.  When I was there last year, they were making a big fuss over (and I quote), the new Ultra-high MPG VW TDIs that are capable of 42mpg!!!  As if that figure was some wonder of modern science!

Offline Andy

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Re: Roadkill
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2015, 01:35:30 pm »
Don't forget that most US fuel is rated in AKI, not RON. 91AKI is about 95RON and 94AKI is 98RON or thereabouts.

42mpg in American is 50mpg in Imperial/English, so not quite as bad as it sounds! Plus the EPA tests for the USA are more aggressive than Europe's NEDC test cycles (harder accelerations and higher speeds), so even when the measuring units are the same, NEDC will give a more economical result.

NEDC is going to be replaced by a new test cycle called WLTP (World harmonised Light vehicle Test Procedure), with the new global standard being finalised this year for adoption by individual countries thereafter. It'll be in play in the UK by 2020 if memory serves. The idea is that the new cycle is much more like real life, so consumers will have a better idea of how a car might perform in their hands. Additionally, the clue being in the title, it's intended for global adoption - so confusion between different figures in different countries/markets is reduced. Oh, and OEMs have to do less tests, which saves 'em cash.

Anyway, back to Roadkill - it's great!

Offline physicsfool

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Re: Roadkill
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2015, 02:34:21 pm »
Yes Mark Crox explained the fuel conversion over on club polo a couple of weeks back, Thanks for the explanation Andy always forget gallon has a different value over there

Interesting how the american market has stuck with superchargers and hasnt gone the way of the turbo as Europe did.

I do like the idea of having so many companies that provide quality bolt on alternatives carbs/brakes/ignition systems.

Offline ereeiz

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Re: Roadkill
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2015, 06:15:28 pm »
Perhaps the supercharger is more popular as it's more robust? Pretty simple too, compared to a super duper high rpm spinning impeller/propeller that requires pipes and valves? I'm thinking (and trying not to stereotype) that the tuning game in the US was originated from WW2 soldiers with disposable income, which created hot rodding and the likes. Turbos are (were) less reliable, harder to tune (like an on/off switch) and perhaps wouldn't "suit" the torquey nature of V8's? Whereas bolting on a blower gives you even more torque and runs out of puff at the top end like the engine naturally does. I think what I'm trying to get at is superchargers have pretty much been around since the internal combustion engine came about, not so sure about turbos (feel free to correct me here anyone, just writing my thoughts more than anything- might be talking rubbish!).

Offline Yoof

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Re: Roadkill
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2015, 08:24:29 pm »
Perhaps the supercharger is more popular as it's more robust? Pretty simple too, compared to a super duper high rpm spinning impeller/propeller that requires pipes and valves? I'm thinking (and trying not to stereotype) that the tuning game in the US was originated from WW2 soldiers with disposable income, which created hot rodding and the likes. Turbos are (were) less reliable, harder to tune (like an on/off switch) and perhaps wouldn't "suit" the torquey nature of V8's? Whereas bolting on a blower gives you even more torque and runs out of puff at the top end like the engine naturally does. I think what I'm trying to get at is superchargers have pretty much been around since the internal combustion engine came about, not so sure about turbos (feel free to correct me here anyone, just writing my thoughts more than anything- might be talking rubbish!).

Turbo patent was granted in 1905 according to wiki-lies...

The US has always gone in a different direction to Europe, it's fair to say they like what they know, and know what they like. Big capacity with giggle gas or a blower has always been the order of the day, with a 'nitrous plate' under a hoofing great carb.

This was reflected in the UK and Europe too, in any scene the US had big influences, mainly drag racing. Walk the pits of Santa Pod in the late 90s early 00s and you'd not see many (if any) turbos strapped to a big block.

Fast forward 15 years and you're behind if you've not got two massive blowers hanging off the front of your car  ;D Fuel injection and funny ECU things are normal now too.

Durability wise, turbos are definitely more robust, and can be controlled much better, cheaper yadada - this doesn't stop OEMs using them occasionally, but deffinately in a more premium application, whereas your turbo in common place in any shopping trolley with a 0.9l 3-cyl motor pushing over 100PS.

To answer the original question - yes octane booster if required, but anything sold in the last 10 years will have knock sensors to mop anything up, calibrations also differ market to market.